Mutual Support

In my inaugural 2018 post, I presented three takeaway themes from FATF’s November 2017 Guidance on Private Sector Information Sharing.   The first – Data privacy and AML/CFT are not mutually exclusive – is a straight forward observation that is addressed head on by the Guidance.

“AML/CFT and DPP public policy goals are not mutually exclusive and should recognize support and be balanced.”

It is an overdue statement that should bring privacy to the forefront of financial crime compliance discussion, not only because it brings data privacy on par, but because of the assertion that they support each other.   But even as the Guidance emphasizes mutual support, it doesn’t exactly articulate how one reinforces the other.  Yet, it is important to understand the relationship because it promotes effective and legal data sharing for AML/CFT.

AML/CFT compliance programs depend on the sharing of data among many different groups, and requires financial institutions (FIs) to know what data to collect and use, know when to share it, and with whom to share it.  These are difficult tasks owing to a host of factors including, but not limited to, the varied types of data and volume of data needed for risk-based decision-making. Privacy controls would seem to complicate the matter because they mandate certain rules for processing data for specific purposes.

As I have said in the past, the duality of data – the condition that financial data is both commercial and potentially criminal at the same time creates a conundrum for FIs.  Determining when financial data’s commercial use ended and when AML/CFT use began is therefore a fundamental problem of implementation because that point determines when commercial rules concluded and AML/CFT data privacy governance kicked in. To further complicate matters, the ‘switch’ is not permanent since an individual’s data flows back and forth during the life-cycle of the business relationship. Lastly, the criteria will be unique within an FI and its group [internal], or if sharing is conducted FI to FI, or if an FI transfers to authorities (and vice versa) [external].

However, this is where understanding the privacy/compliance support nexus is important. Knowing this, while FATF did not explicitly outline how privacy supports AML/CFT or how to apply it in a compliance program, it did provide components of that support process, which I have been incorporating into a framework.  In this post, I outline the role of three components;

  • Technology
  • Data standardization
  • Data governance

Technology:

FATF notes that FIs confront a mish-mash of incompatible systems, software, and data formats within and across a group (often from mergers and acquisitions), and/or deal with older technologies that make upgrades difficult or impossible without incurring massive costs – all of which can impede information sharing.  Each environment may be designed to process different types of data for varied uses.  Some systems may be repetitious AML solutions across business lines, while others may ingest data that was not collected for AML use, but may be necessary at some point in the compliance workflow. The latter can make data transfer difficult, because the data was collected for one purpose, but essential to another use.  This is certainly true for example, KYC processes, where customer information is collected for a commercial relationship, but could easily be escalated to EDD or FIU groups.  Again, it is not a stretch to say that many banking databases or systems hold dual purpose or dual use data.

A primary exercise in applying privacy by design principles involves conducting a data inventory (aka mapping, lineage) – a survey of what data is collected and from where, its purpose, its access permissions, conditions of transfer, and its storage, retention, and deletion.  Done well, it maps where AML and non-AML systems and data comingle, which help identify where commercial to compliance flows occur.

Data Standardization & Data Governance:

FATF notes that standardization of data types and formats “may also promote data sharing by enabling integration,” and provides examples of “information elements” necessary for data sharing and the value each data elements provides the FI.  The Guidance points out the usefulness of certain data elements (p.8), in “global risk assessment” (p.10) and “product services and geographical risks” (p. 11). Although FATF does not get into details, successful risk-based assessments require at least three groups of data– market (business views), regulatory (data demanded by law), and criminal typologies (data provided by authorities) – each involve unique governance considerations and many beyond the scope of privacy laws that govern the FI’s own data.

The data inventory allows information technology staff to survey compatibilities across the business, but it also helps identify what data is fit for purpose in the construction of AML/CFT standardized data sets.  This exercise must involve content and compliance SMEs working alongside IT pros.  Only their combined knowledge can create the focused data sets required.

Focused and flexible data sets attuned to shifting risk conditions contribute to robust decision-making matrixes that set signal points or benchmarks to help FIs determine when ‘enough’ information has been gathered to warrant sharing within the corporate group or with authorities without evoking the ire of AML or privacy regulators.  In privacy parlance this is part of data minimization, using the data necessary for the job, which supports quality analysis, reduces labor, and maximizes the value of FI intelligence to the business, other FIs, or authorities.  Standardization contributes to setting access points and permissions that establish audit trails – essential for confidentiality, which mitigates AML/CFT secrecy laws that can lead to blockages.  Lastly, the entire process maps data flows that inform data governance (i.e. in EU parlance, when GDPR’s “safeguards” apply), as it highlights when data passes from the commercial to compliance spaces (or comingles).

Information Sharing in Practice?

FATF (and this report) suggests that FIs are (slowly) operationalizing privacy in AML using these methods, and are engaging with national data protection authorities as they do so.  The Annex provides brief examples where FIs and privacy authorities currently consult (e.g. France, Spain), but a country-by-country approach produces inconsistencies that will not suit a multinational financial system.  For example, the EU’s GDPR allows Member States determine how data safeguards will be applied to AML/CFT data, which means that multinationals will not be able to implement consistent data sharing networks across their own groups, let alone the globe.  As these standards spread to other financial centers like Japan, the problems will be compounded – a fact that FATF also noted:

“…global financial institutions operating in multiple jurisdictions would benefit from data protection authorities issuing clarifying interpretation and guidance on the extent to which sharing personal data across borders for AML/CFT purposes is permissible under the public interest or other derogation(s) contained in different data protection regulations on data transfers (e.g. the extent to which transfers of data made for the purpose of complying with AML/CFT is permissible).”

There is still much work to be done before FIs (and other obligated entities) harness the mutually supportive data privacy and AML/CFT practices.  While much of this involves breaking down education and informational silos within FIs, among policy-makers, and regulators, the FATF Guidance signals some progress.  This high-level framework briefly described ways that privacy is complementary to AML/CFT, and I will be devoting much of my energy in the coming months to further developing the details.

Data Sharing, AML/CFT & Data Privacy: 2018, Together at Last?

Happy and healthy 2018 to all!

In this series of blog posts, I will discuss FATF’s November 2017 Guidance on Private Sector Information Sharing.  I am happy to say that the Guidance addresses many of the points I noted in my 2016 SWIFT Institute paper on AML/CTF and data privacy (e.g. cross-border data protection law, how confidentiality can forbid group sharing).

The FATF Guidance is a welcome development and seems to be part of a shift in thinking towards more favorable attitudes regarding data governance among AML/CFT professionals that I have personally noted in the past year. This is probably due to a host of factors including the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) constantly being in the headlines, the rise of cooperative public-private groups such as the UK’s Joint Money Laundering Intelligence Taskforce (JMLIT) and US’s FinCEN Exchange, Brexit, and developments in Fintech.

Building off its 2016 efforts, this FATF Guidance puts information sharing on the map in committing its governments to implement agendas to meet these goals.  The Guidance tells the private sector that states consider data sharing an internal and group priority.  Hopefully, it will provide financial institutions with enough confidence to contribute to forming the standards necessary so data sharing (public-private and private-private) can effectively balance market and national security interests.  FATF emphasizes this throughout the text, noting that putting the guidelines into practice requires public and private views and expertise.  Notably, FATF adds data privacy authorities to the Guidance’s intended audience alongside governments and financial institutions, thereby recognizing the importance of these views to the goal.

However, as is typical of any international group’s stance on a globally complicated issue with conditions that change according to jurisdiction, FATF guidance can only provide guideposts – it does not, and cannot, furnish the detailed governance and operational processes that regulators and financial institutions need.  This is not a criticism, but a reminder of the role and limitations of these Guidances and how much work there is yet to be done by national authorities and the private sector.*

FATF confirmed the widely-held belief that information sharing is essential to a “well-functioning AML/CFT framework.” In forthcoming posts, I will expand on three thematic streams within the Guidance;

  1. Data protection and privacy and AML/CFT are not mutually exclusive
  2. Financial institutions must share data internally and across the group
  3. Effective data sharing is only possible with public-private and private-private cooperation. (Recognizing the sometime cyclical cycle that public-private groups are “source as well as target of information flow.”)

All while noting that two conditions pervade all of the above;

  • Siloed views are not effective
  • Technology and governance are intertwined

I am looking forward to getting on the blog wagon again and seeing how the data sharing regime develops.  A thank you to everyone who has been supportive of my work on this topic over the years. Keep engaging – there’s more to come in 2018.

Cheers!

*Having said this, I hope the Wolfsberg Group follows suit and completes its 2014 guidance on AML/CFT and data privacy.

 

**This blog represents my personal opinions and does not represent LexisNexis Risk Solutions.  My research is my personal intellectual property and has been in no way influenced by any member of the financial services community or by government officials.

Good-bye 2016: To 2018

Happy New Year (a bit early)! 2016 was quite an exciting and busy year with many personal and professional transitions that left little time for blogging.  However, I’m back with insights as the financial services and authorities work throughout 2017 to implement the AML/CTF and data protection legislation and agreements for 2018.

Before I discuss recent developments in the field, I’d like to comment on the release of my SWIFT Institute-sponsored paper on US-EU AML/CTF & Privacy for Multinational Banks,* which was published in August (download here). The Institute also invited me to speak about it at Sibos in Geneva, Switzerland in September (download slides here).

My experience with the Institute has been fantastic. A sincere thank you to Peter Ware and Nancy Murphy for their kindness, professionalism, and support for independent research that allows academics to reach practitioners with meaningful analysis.**

19 AML/CTF & Data Privacy Compliance Conflicts Graphic from the Paper (Caution: Not as Impressive as SWIFT’s interactive graphic!)

I highly recommend that you visit the Institute’s fabulous interactive graphic for an overview of the 19 compliance conflicts (view here).

Don’t forget to read the last section of the paper that covers Profiling! It lives in all 19 issues and impacts every single AML/CTF compliance function.

About the paper:

The paper is a primer for financial institutions and policy-makers to identify 19 legal conflicts that may affect a multinational’s ability to comply with the AML/CTF and privacy regimes.  I hope that this information enables private actors to understand how their internal processes may expose them to regulatory risk; for public actors, I hope it provides a better understanding of the challenges the private sector faces in multi-jurisdictional compliance, but especially how these issues affect the quality of data that private corporations ultimately provide to authorities to achieve the end goal – combating financial crime and political violence.

As one can imagine, there was not enough space for an analysis of all the dimensions or actors involved, so a few things to note;

  • The US Terrorist Financing Tracking Program (TFTP) demands a paper of its own due to developments regarding the development of an EU TFTS.
  • I shelved an anonymous AML/CTF & Privacy survey due to an insufficient data sample. I will conduct the survey again, but the preliminary results demonstrated a clear US and EU divide.  Respondents did highlight AML/CTF and data protection concerns when dealing with high risk third country areas.
  • Section 3.2 on Public-Private cooperation could have been a paper onto itself (and may appear as a forthcoming chapter). Multinationals face tough decisions when they operate in multiple countries where they must comply with data requests from authorities.

The Takeaway

Despite the difficulties ahead, in the paper’s conclusions, I state that the financial services should be acting now to align their data protection obligations in 4AMLD to the GDPR.

4AMLD and the GDPR consistently refer to ‘safeguards’ for data processing, but these safeguards are ultimately left up to EU Member State law, so the diversity among EU Member State law will continue.  The GDPR formally calls for cooperation among industry associations to formulate “codes of conduct” to set the technical and organizational standards outlined in the Regulation.  Article 38 (40 and 41 in final version) outlines the codes’ provisions, which are broad enough to accommodate compliance’s risk-based regime, including secure systems and fair and transparent data processing for legitimate interests.

The private sector should work with Member States to create AML/CTF & privacy-centric ‘codes of conduct’ that harmonize with these developing national safeguards .

I’ll be posting updates on those efforts as I become aware of them.

Have a healthy and safe 2017!

Want to learn more?  Join me on 22 February 2017 for a webinar on Nomoneylaundering.com 

Still to Come:
4AMLD Amendments (aka 5AMLD) and the GDPR impact

*Paper referrals to EU legislation predate the final version of the GDPR and the articles and recitals may have changed.

**This blog represents my personal opinions and does not represent LexisNexis Risk Solutions.  My research is my personal intellectual property and has been in no way influenced by any member of the financial services community or by government officials.

The “Weaponization of Finance” is more than Sanctions – It’s Data

I am always happy when I see people address the links between finance and security because it is so rare.

Last month, Daniel Drezner, of Tufts University and the Brookings Institute, wrote about the “hard limits of economic statecraft” regarding the use of sanctions against Russia’s actions in the Ukraine (interview here too).  This week, Ian Bremmer and Cliff Kupchan, of the Eurasia Group listed “The Weaponization of Finance” as a “Top Risk of 2015.”

Bremmer and Kupchan correctly assert that the US’s global financial position affords American policymakers powerful means to influence behaviors beyond its borders.  Specifically, they note access to capital markets and sanctions as “tools of coercive diplomacy.”  They cite the US influence on norms in international organizations, the dollar’s role as the premier reserve and investment currency, and the vulnerability of the private banking sector to cyber-attack as further evidence of its power resources.

Sanctions deserve a place in the statecraft toolbox, but as Business Insider’s @elenaholodny summarized, it is difficult to employ successfully (See also David Baldwin’s classic Economic Statecraft, Meghan O’Sullivan Shrewd Sanctions, Cortright and Lopez Smart Sanctions, and Drezner’s own Sanctions Paradox).

Restricting the use of finance to sanctions limits its value to foreign affairs. The technological revolution in banking, which has ditigialized the industry, finance’s multinational presence, and the increase in recordkeeping and reporting requirements after 9/11 and the 2008 crisis, has provided policymakers with an opportunity to harness financial data to map behaviors, networks of violence, and illicit economies across borders.

The Eurasia Group hints to this, “The United States is expanding its ability to track the financial transactions [my emphasis] of government leaders of concern, as well as their state and private sector allies, in order to close their access to capital and property.”

But governments use financial data for more than sanctions. They do it to detect weaknesses in the system and to track networks of illicit crime and political violence.

Thus, financial data’s ability to help map networks of behavior when combined with other types of information mean that finance’s role in foreign policy extends well beyond economics.

That is, of course, if government agencies can acquire that data – legally or otherwise.

I argue (briefly explained here and here) that financial data intelligence is one example of a new type of statecraft suited to the digital age; Information Statecraft – the attempt to influence through the acquisition, control, or presentation of data, information, or knowledge.

However, financial data isn’t solely held by governments; it’s held by private financial institutions, which presents numerous challenges to using financial data for sanctions or other policies.  Bremmer and Kupchan also allude to this point – “the weaponization of finance is a tool that can be use with minimal cooperation from other governments.”  While it oversimplifies the relationships involved, it does highlight the importance of private sector compliance.

Financial institutions have always treasured data for their own purposes, but now states are demanding they record, maintain, and report more of it to authorities (e.g. FATF recommendations for Politically Exposed Persons, Beneficial Ownership, Know Your Customer rules, Suspicious Action/Activity Reports, among others). For decades, and more so after 9/11, governments expect bankers to be AML/CTF sentinels, which is very far from their primary business, to make money.

The weaponization of finance is real, and has been evolving for a while.  We need to expand our views of statecraft to accommodate the new realities of the digital world, and this is especially true of the relationship between finance and foreign policy.